The Latest

“The heterosexuals are making us into a business”

From my fieldnotes (Kampala, 2015). We are sitting in our usual spot. Except today the group is larger. ███ comes about five minutes after I get there. Still wearing what he was wearing to work today. He sat down ordered a beer and started talking about corruption in Uganda — and how the LGBT community … Continue reading “The heterosexuals are making us into a business”

Advertisements

Independence day

Uganda gained its freedom 53 years ago today. But the fight for freedom continues for LGBTQ Ugandans. No one is free until we are all free. I did a photostory with Keith for Queer Collective - to capture the feeling that many are having within the kuchu community on this day.  

“I’m me. I’m a trans. I’m Rihanna now.”

From my fieldnotes (Kampala, 2015). “Being a trans its not something you manipulate. It’s just something that comes from you. It is just something that is inborn in you. But putting on a dress and moving all over the town — it makes me feel good — it makes me feel like I’m bringing all … Continue reading “I’m me. I’m a trans. I’m Rihanna now.”

“A lot of things happened in prison”

We were still sleeping — it was approaching 6:30am. The landlord said ‘you people get ready for what’s coming.’ we heard people screaming outside. We opened the door and the chairmen, journalists, police, and people from around were there. They said ‘get out!’ ‘remove all your things!’ ‘We wont tolerate gay people in our area.’

“So that day she decided to make me leave”

From my fieldnotes (Kampala, 2015). I interviewed ███  at Ice Breakers Uganda — a safe space for kuchus to organize, work, and socialize. Often when I visit the compound there are10-12 young people sitting around the living room in the house. ███ identifies as a lesbian. She told me, “Ice Breakers Uganda is one of … Continue reading “So that day she decided to make me leave”

“It’s just the way I am”

From my fieldnotes (Kampala, 2015). I asked if she was ever worried about people recognizing her here. I moved to this side because there are no newspapers on this side. Most people don’t read newspapers here. They can't read because of the illiteracy. So they don’t really know me. — Okay, but some know. But … Continue reading “It’s just the way I am”